Report 
  Title  
  PREPARING FOR THE 21ST CENTURY: RESEARCH METHODS IN DEVELOPING MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES FOR ARTHROPODS AND ALLERGENS IN THE STRUCTURAL ENVIRONMENT
  Author  
  RICHARD J. BRENNER
  Abstract  
  Public pressures, and mandates by government agencies will require that we develop strategies that reduce exposure of humans to pesticides. These must be developed so that they manipulate populations to the extent that likelihood of infestation is reduced, or assuming that they will infest a structure, likelihood of infestation is reduced. Development of such strategies requires experimental 'monitored' natural environments and novel statistical procedures that evaluate spatial relationships. In pursuance of these goals, research was initiated to develop spatial analysis techniques to quantify the response of German cockroaches to a redistribution of food and water resources. A population from a Miami housing project was released into a speciallyanstructed, climatecontrolled, monitored 'natural' structure. Spatial distributions were measured repeatedly from Aug. 1990 through January 1991. Spatial analysis procedures were developed (based on geostatistics) to measure distribution before and after food and water resources were redistributed in mid-November. Probability contours and a 'spatial dynamics index' were developed to detect and quantify spatial continuity and to examine the strength of those changes. Data comparing tap counts for 2 dates were used to evaluate statistical procedures. Although traditional statistics failed to show a difference in these populations; spatial statistics clearly revealed that changes had occurred due to resource redistribution. Probability contours, based on indicator data sets, have strong value at locating foci. These can be used as a guide in a management program for prescribing treatment, or for allocating and partitioning resources based on probabilities of reinfestation. Probability contours and spatial dynamics indices may have wide-spread commercial utility in several areas: prescribing treatment, or allocating and partitioning resources based on probabilities of reinfestation, documenting effective pest management, assessment of interventions in housedust mite abatement, confirmation of residue reduction (dirt. erease. duct debris. etc.). or confirmation of foci reduction. In Gainesville, spatial dynamics indices are being used in developing strategies using non-traditional chemical interventions (repellents), nonchemical interventions (enhanced air flow, construction design, moisture management, etc.), and allergen management. In preparation of expanding research in this area, 3 additional buildings have been constructed; one of which was constructed without exterior walls, so that experimental materials or procedures can be evaluated as a management strategy for the next century.