Report 
  Title  
  WOODWORM-A NECESSARY CASE FOR TREATMENT? NEW TECHNIQUES FOR THE DETECTION AND CONTROL OF FURNITURE BEETLE
  Key Words  
  Anobium, Ptinus, woodworm, pest status, pheromone trap, heating, freezing, atmospheric gases, structural timber
  Author  
  D. B. PINNIGER AND R. E. CHILD
  Abstract  
  Woodworm or furniture beetle Anobium punctatum can cause serious damage to wooden objects and the structural timber in buildings. In the light of recent evidence of the reduced incidence of this pest in museum objects and in buildings it is timely to re-examine the need for chemical treatments and also to evaluate some of the alternative techniques. Over the years, treatments have been carried out with a wide range of chemicals to control infestations and prevent damage. Many of the treatments which were previously used are no longer acceptable for reasons of safety and legislation. Trials have shown that traps with pheromone lures can be used for the detection of adult Anobium. Monitoring programmes using these traps coupled with environmental monitoring and control mean that decisons on the need for treatment can be based on hard evidence of active pest presence rather than of fear generated by old emergence holes. If and when it is deemed that treatment is needed then the options for use of residual chemicals can be considered together with alternative treatments such as heat, cold, and atmospheric gases. By applying sound principles of pest management to Anobium, it should be possible to target control more effectively and at the same time decrease the incidence of unnecessary treatments with pesticides.