Report 
  Title  
  INSECTS IN THE URBAN ENVIRONMENT: PEST PRESSURES VERSUS CONSERVATION CONCERN
  Key Words  
  Urbanization, urban pest control, IPM
  Author  
  M. J. SAMWAYS
  Abstract  
  Spatial scale, from global and regional, through landscape down to habitat and microhabitat is a critical concept for both understanding pest- and threatened-insect biology. At the finer scale, there are some distinct influences and impacts on insect populations, some of these (e.g. open water butts, unburied organic matter) encourage population surges of a few species to become pests. Others (e.g. electric lights, fast-moving traffic) are a blanket mortality factor for many species. However, not all aspects of urbanization are harmful to biodiversity, especially where there is ecological landscaping. Furthermore, there is no evidence that urban pest control alone has a major adverse impact on biodiversity. Landscape degradation and habitat destruction has far greater effect. With appropriate IPM, coupled with ecological landscaping, much, but not all, biodiversity will be protected, global climate change aside.