Report 
  Title  
  IMIDACLOPRID USE in TERMITE CONTROL OPERATIONS GLOBALLY and CHANGING USE PATTERNS in the UNITED STATES
  Key Words  
  chloronicotinyl subterranean termites Reticulitermes Coptotermes Heterotermes
  Author  
  Byron L. Reid, Robert Brinkmann, Graeme Smith, Kiyoto Ishizaka, Boy Palis and Vivian De Villiers
  Abstract  
  The soil-applied termiticide, imidacloprid (Premise®, Hachikusan®) was registered for termite control in Japan in 1993. This non-repellent termiticide causes mortality in termites foraging near treated structures, and is transmissible to other termites not directly exposed to treated soil. A two-year study, conducted to determine the performance of precision placement of termiticide, involved treatment of 56 termite-infested structures in the United States. Forty-four (78.6%) of these sites achieved complete control of the structural termite infestation with initial application. Twelve sites (21.4%) required minimal spot treatments to control newly discovered termite activity. Termite control with non-repellent termiticides can be less disruptive to occupants of infested-structures and at greatly reduced labor costs. In this project, total termiticide use was reduced by nearly 50%, and interior use of termiticide was reduced by more than 70%, without compromising the long-term effectiveness of integrated termite management programs.