Report 
  Title  
  MULTICOLORED ASIAN LADY BEETLE (HARMONIA AXYRIDIS) as a NUISANCE PEST in HOUSEHOLDS in OHIO
  Key Words  
  Lady beetle nuisance pest survey pesticides
  Author  
  Margaret F. Heulsman, Joseph Kovach, Jim Jasinski, Curtis Young and Bruce Eisley
  Abstract  
  The multicolored Asian lady beetle, Harmonia axyridis, was introduced into the United States to serve as a biological control agent and has now become well established in Ohio. To determine the nature and distribution of the nuisance problem in Ohio, we conducted a statewide survey during the summer of 2001. The survey results helped to delineate typical characteristics of homes that are infested by H. axyridis. The average house was 73 years old, two-story, wood- or vinyl-sided, and has lots of trees on at least three sides. The colors of the house and roof were not found to be a determining factor for an infestation problem. The data were used to map the progression of the infestation problem throughout the state over the past decade. The data showed that the problem originated in eastern and southern Ohio and has spread north and west in the past decade. The most irritating problems associated with an H. axyridis infestation are the foul odors the beetles emit and the stains resulting from their hemolymph when they reflex bleed. Biting and food contamination are also significant concerns. An associated health problem is emerging, as evidenced by the 13% of the respondents who reported dermal or respiratory allergic reaction to the beetles. The survey participants were asked to provide the date in the fall of 2001 when the beetles first arrived in significant numbers at their home. This information was graphed with local weather data to derive predictive events for the arrival of H. axyridis in any given locale. H. axyridis are prompted to search for overwintering sites on the first day over 18C after a significant drop in temperature, usually to near freezing. Some survey participants also tracked the management methods used throughout the period of infestation in the fall of 2001. These data were used to develop case study reports on the efficacy of the different management techniques.